Each week our scan collects weak – and less weak – signals…

Note the importance of geopolitical uncertainty for businesses, as exemplified once more with the so far diplomatic crisis with Qatar… Yet, the corporate sector needs not being prey to political and geopolitical uncertainty but can use the same tools and methods as those used by intelligence and military, or more broadly state’s administrations to anticipate and plan their strategy and responses ahead.

Each section focuses on signals related to a specific theme: world (international politics and geopolitics); economy; science; analysis, strategy and futures; technology and weapons; energy and environment. However, in a complex world, categories are merely a convenient way to present information, when facts and events interact across boundaries.

As polarisation rises, not only internationally but also domestically within many countries, weak signals are not only “direct”, describing facts, but also, increasingly, “indirect”, i.e. perspectives on reality indicating more about the positioning of actors, the rising tension(s) and uncertainty, than about facts. The Weekly also aims at monitoring this rising tension to evaluate the possibility for future overt crises, and the underlying dynamics.

Read the 8 June 2017 scan


The Weekly is the scan of The Red (Team) Analysis Society and it focuses on political and geopolitical uncertainty, on national and international security issues. 

The information collected (crowdsourced) does not mean endorsement but points to new, emerging, escalating or stabilising problems and issues.

If you wish to consult the scan after the end of the week period, use the “archives” directly on The Weekly.

Featured image: Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), on the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two companion galaxies to our own Milky Way galaxy, can be seen as bright smudges in the night sky, in the centre of the photograph. This photograph was produced by European Southern Observatory (ESO), ESO/C. Malin [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

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