horizon scanning, red analysis, the red (Team) Analysis Society, warning, risk assessment and horizon scanning

Each week our scan collects weak – and less weak – signals for global changes, national and international security, political and geopolitical risk of interest to private and public actors.

Editorial: Tension appears to rise so high and increasingly so between the U.S. and China (including considering the threat China’s progress in Quantum Information Science creates for American SIGINT – Signal Intelligence – supremacy, among others), that we may start wondering if we should not start seriously envisioning the possibility of war. We are still far from a war that would be probable, yet… In other words, we may start pondering which signals should be monitored and how should they be sequenced (timeline indicators) to allow us warning about escalation towards open war. The types of war that might then be waged need also being foreseen.

Find out more on horizon scanning, signals, what they are and how to use them:

Horizon Scanning and Monitoring for Anticipation: Definition and Practice“.

Read below our latest complimentary Weekly horizon scanning.

Each section of the scan focuses on signals related to a specific theme: world (international politics and geopolitics); economy; science; analysis, strategy and futures; AI, technology and weapons; energy and environment. However, in a complex world, categories are merely a convenient way to present information, when facts and events interact across boundaries.

Read the 22 November 2018 scan

The Weekly is the complimentary scan of The Red (Team) Analysis Society. It focuses on political and geopolitical uncertainty, on national and international security issues.

The information collected (crowdsourced) does not mean endorsement but points to new, emerging, escalating or stabilising problems and issues.

Featured image: Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), on the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two companion galaxies to our own Milky Way galaxy, can be seen as bright smudges in the night sky, in the centre of the photograph. This photograph was produced by European Southern Observatory (ESO), ESO/C. Malin [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

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