horizon scanning, red analysis, the red (Team) Analysis Society, warning, risk assessment and horizon scanning

Each week our scan collects weak – and less weak – signals for political and geopolitical risk of interest to private and public actors.

Find out more on horizon scanning, signals, what they are and how to use them:

Horizon Scanning and Monitoring for Anticipation: Definition and Practice“.

Welcome to the now obvious 21st century conundrum: The already impacting (we told you so) climate change entails huge costs. To reduce them – to put it mildly – immense and rising might and expenses would be necessary. As a result, profits and use of what is at the heart of our current civilisation – fossil fuels – appear to be necessary, but then climate change and its costs will heighten… How is that for an interesting riddle?

The solution out of this mad and accelerating vicious spiral could be in thinking and acting out of the box, including by being powerful and smart enough to entice outdated elite and power players in not derailing efforts. Expect nonetheless unavoidable direct and collateral damage.

Read below our latest complimentary Weekly horizon scanning. 

Each section of the scan focuses on signals related to a specific theme: world (international politics and geopolitics); economy; science; analysis, strategy and futures; AI, technology and weapons; energy and environment. However, in a complex world, categories are merely a convenient way to present information, when facts and events interact across boundaries.

Read the 4 October 2018 scan

The Weekly is the complimentary scan of The Red (Team) Analysis Society. It focuses on political and geopolitical uncertainty, on national and international security issues.

The information collected (crowdsourced) does not mean endorsement but points to new, emerging, escalating or stabilising problems and issues.

Featured image: Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), on the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two companion galaxies to our own Milky Way galaxy, can be seen as bright smudges in the night sky, in the centre of the photograph. This photograph was produced by European Southern Observatory (ESO), ESO/C. Malin [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

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